The View Up Here

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Posts Tagged ‘M/S’

Building the MS Alice Microphone – Part 2

Posted by Tom Benedict on 23/11/2016

This is the second half of a two-part article describing my build of the mid-side Alice microphone, following the Instructable written by Jules Ryckenbusch: Build the MS Alice Stereo Microphone. In Part 1 of this article I ran through how I was planning to build it (mostly following the same steps I used in another two-part series I wrote about another of Jules’s Instructables, Modify a Cheap LDC Condenser Microphone, namely: BM-800 Microphone Conversion Part 1 and Part 2.) I also covered my design for the saddle and post that holds the three capsules in the particular orientations required for Jules’s MS microphone build. (Jules used a different method, using PVC pipe, which you’ll see in his Instructable if you decide to build one of your own.)

Since writing Part 1 all the bits and pieces came in. I was eager to see how the 3D printed saddle and post turned out, and how well the TSB-165A capsules fit.

M-S Alice Capsule Saddle and Post - Unpopulated

I designed the cavities for the capsules at-size, meaning I didn’t leave any slop for fit. The plastic Shapeways uses to make their least expensive printed parts is described as “strong and flexible”. I took them up on that, figuring the part would flex enough to allow the capsules to snap into place. It worked like a charm.

M-S Alice Capsule Saddle and Post - Populated

The fit is snug, but not snug enough to hold the capsules in use. As with my first Alice, I glued the capsules into the saddle with E-6000 adhesive.

I’m a little disappointed with the handling noise on my first Alice mic. I chalk some of that up to the metal saddle and post, but some of it I chalk up to the relatively stiff wire I used to connect the capsule to the PCB. It was stiff enough that manipulating the wire wound up breaking off one of the ground tabs from the TSB-2555B capsule I used on that mic. Rather than repeat that experience, and in an effort to reduce conduction paths for handling noise, I gutted some of the Mogami cable I use for all my microphone projects and used the wires to connect the capsules. (NOTE: It didn’t actually affect handling noise that much. After thumping various bits of the mic, I’ve come to the conclusion the dominant frequency of the handling noise is driven by the resonant frequency of the mesh in the headbasket.)

I already had two Pimped Alice PCBs built, tuned, and ready to go for this project. The remaining steps were to screw one board onto each side of the mic frame, solder the capsule wires to the boards, solder the four 0.022uF capacitors between the ground pin (pin 1) and the remaining pins of the XLR connector (2, 3, 4, and 5), and to solder wires between the XLR and the PCBs.

M-S Alice Internals

Since I oriented the two capsules of the figure-eight mic side-by-side, they won’t fit inside the headbasket with the foam liner in place. So I stripped the foam out before closing up the mic.

The very last step was to build the 5-pin XLR to dual 3-pin XLR splitter cable. There are a number of ways I could’ve done this, but I followed (mostly) Jules’s build on the cable as well, using separate Mogami lavalier cables for each channel. This is a wonderfully floppy wire, and does an excellent job of reducing handling noise transmitted through the cable.

The one change I made to Jules’s design was to jacket the central eight feet of cable in a woven sleeve to keep it from tangling.

M-S Alice Patch Cord

I left the last foot and a half at each end loose, though, to take advantage of the wire’s floppiness. (Hey, that’s actually a word spellcheck recognizes!)

And at long long last I’m able to play with mid-side recording and compare it against my EM-172 based SASS.

SASS vs. M-S Comparison

Big big thanks to the following for making this all possible:

  • Jules Ryckenbusch – for writing the two Instructables that got me going on these microphones
  • Homero Leal – for coming up with the PCB layout for the Alice boards used in Jules’s Instructables
  • Scott Helmke – for designing the Alice circuit in the first place
  • Ricardo Lee and all of the above – for their endless patience with all of my questions and what-ifs
  • Dr. Ing – for designing the Schoeps CMC-5 in the first place, without which none of this would exist

For my own contribution, here’s the link to the MS Alice capsule saddle and post on Shapeways. I’ve listed these at-cost, with no mark up (meaning I don’t see a dime of the 5.35 USD price tag at the time of this writing – labor of love).

Have fun recording!

Tom

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Building the MS Alice Microphone – Part 1

Posted by Tom Benedict on 11/11/2016

This is a short pair of articles that glosses over most of the details of how I’m building a self-contained mid-side (MS) Alice microphone into a Neewer NW-800 microphone body. Part 1 covers most of the design and preparation, and Part 2 will cover the build.

The reason why this pair of articles is so brief is that most of the nitty-gritty was already covered in another pair of articles: BM-800 Microphone Conversion Part 1 and Part 2. The major differences between that microphone and this one are a change in capsules (Transsound TSB-165A instead of a Transsound TSB-2555B), the number of capsules (three instead of one), the number of Pimped Alice boards (two instead of one), and a change tof XLR connector (5-pin rather than 3-pin).

With the exception of how I’m planning to mount the capsules, all of this follows the Instructable written by Jules Ryckenbusch: Build the MS Alice Stereo Microphone. That’s the real reference for this build, so if you decide to build one of these yourself be sure to follow Jules’s notes.

The easy stuff first:

When I built my first Alice microphone I built three PCBs rather than just the one I needed, so I already have two Pimped Alice boards ready and waiting in the wings. I was on the fence whether to build a second mic around a TSB-2555B capsule or go straight to the MS Alice. After some recent field tests, I decided to commit the two boards to an MS Alice.

Jules pulled a neat trick for getting two signals out of a single XLR connector: use a different XLR connector! In his build he replaced the 3-pin XLR that came with his BM-800 microphone with a 5-pin. The two outputs share a common ground, but have independent signal pins. I’m following this part of his plan to the letter. (As a side note, this also gives me a spare 3-pin XLR connector to use when I finally build out my parabolic mic. New project in the works!)

The only things left to do were to order three TSB-165A capsules (done) and to figure out how to mount them.

Jules has a nice tutorial on how to build a 3-capsule saddle out of PVC pipe, but I had so much fun machining a custom saddle for my TSB-2555B capsule, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to massively over-complicate life by designing a custom saddle for the MS Alice as well. Here’s what I came up with:

MS Alice TSB-165A Capsule Saddle

Which looks neat and all, but would be stupidly difficult to machine. It’s possible, provided you got rid of, or at least filleted the inside corner between the two side capsules, but it wouldn’t be fun. And since this is all about fun, I cheated. I sent it off to be 3D printed out of nylon. (If this pans out and there’s any interest, I’m happy to make the 3D model available for other people to print.)

So now I’m back to playing the waiting game. I’ve got parts coming in from Redco Audio (5-pin XLR to dual 3-pin XLR splitter cable), Mouser (smaller capacitors for the Alice boards to address the space constraint issue I ran into), Amazon (Switchcraft 5-pin XLR connector, NW-800 body, and associated doodads), JLI Electronics (three TSB-165A capsules), and finally Shapeways (the 3D printed mic saddle).

I’ll write the second half of this series once all the goodies show up.

Tom

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Building New Mics

Posted by Tom Benedict on 17/09/2016

When you’re faced with a dilemma like choosing the next step to improve your recording gear, instead of finding the right answer to the question, sometimes it’s more fun to dodge the issue completely and go off on a tangent.

So I went off on a tangent! Building new microphones!

I’ve currently got two projects in the works. A parabolic mic and a self-contained mid-side mic.

The Parabolic

I’m basing my parabolic mic off of the family of parabolic mics  from  Telinga Microphones. The mics from Telinga offer all kinds of neat options. One contains a cardioid mic facing the parabola and an omni facing away from the parabola. This lets you record a distant sound and the ambient sound field at the same time on two different channels. Another contains two omnis on either side of a baffle plate so you can record a distant sound in stereo.

But at its simplest, a parabolic microphone uses a parabolic reflector to direct pressure waves at a single microphone located at or near its focus. That’s where I’m starting.

I picked up a 22″ parabolic dish from sdill471 on Ebay. He sells them for around 50USD and ships all over the place, including Hawaii (yay!), using USPS shipping.

The microphone for this project is the first EM-172 lavalier mic I built back when I started building external mics for my DR-05. It’s since been converted to XLR and received the full shielded treatment the rest of my EM-172 mics got when I did that conversion.

The rest of the project will be to make all the mechanical bits to place the EM-172 mic at the focus of the dish. I’m drawing a good bit of inspiration from WW Knapp’s Homemade Parabolic Mic page, though I’m making two big departures Knapp’s design: The first is to think more in terms of parts I can make in a machine shop rather than what I can find at the hardware store. (This departure is called “needlessly complicating a good, simple design”.) The other is to take a tip from Klas Strandberg at Telinga: You don’t always want the mic to be at the exact focus of the paraboloid. Having the ability to rack the microphone through focus gives you some much needed flexibility in the field to widen or narrow the pickup pattern of the mic, or even to tune which frequencies are focused on the mic by the dish.

I’ll post the design and build articles once I’ve finished the mic.

Mid-Side Microphone

The entire idea for the self-contained mid-side microphone comes from an Instructables article written by Jules Ryckebusch. Jules took a BM-800 mic – about ~20USD off of Ebay depending on the seller – gutted it, and replaced its innards with two Pimped Alice amplifier boards and three TSB-165 capsules. The really clever part is how he did it, but for any of that to make sense it helps to understand how mid-side microphones work.

The easiest way to understand mid-side recording is to read a really good article about it. What I wrote below won’t be nearly as good, so I urge you to follow that link. That being said, here’s my take on mid-side:

Back when recording was in its infancy no one even thought in terms of stereo recordings, quadrophonic, 5.1, 7.1, or any of the other immersive formats we’ve since come up with. Mid-side was one of the earliest stereo techniques, patented by Alan Blumlein in 1933.

Mid-side uses two microphones: one to pick up the center part of the sound field (the “mid” mic) and another to pick up the sound on either side (the “side” mic). In most cases the mid microphone is a cardioid, which preferentially picks up sound in front of the mic. In all cases the “side” mic is a figure-eight – a microphone that picks up sound in two opposite directions, but nowhere else.

To create what we consider a conventional Left-Right stereo image from a Mid-Side (M/S) recording requires a little math. The equations look like this:

Left = Mid + (+Side)

Right = Mid + (-Side)

In the equations the Mid channel is taken as-is. The Side channel is used twice: first it’s used as-is (+Side) and the second time it’s used inverted (-Side).

As wonky as that sounds, and as convoluted as the post-processing sounds, it offers some distinct advantages when mixing the tracks afterward. Want a wider stereo sound? Mix in a little more of the Side channel and a little less Mid. Want to focus the listener’s attention on the bird in front of the mic and down-play the forest full of frogs chirping in the background? Bump up the Mid and turn down the Side. Want to mix a mono track to go with an accompanying video on Youtube? Use only the Mid channel for clean mono without any phasing issues. The real strength of mid-side is the flexibility and versatility it offers after the fact.

The one catch with mid-side, as with all stereo techniques, is that it requires two distinct microphones. ORTF requires two cardioid mics and a bar to mount them on. A/B requires two widely spaced omnis. Even my SASS consists of two omni mics mounted in an admittedly rather large baffle. M/S is no different, requiring a cardioid and a figure-eight.

What makes M/S special is that you want the microphones to be as close to each other as you can get them. By its very design it’s inherently physically compact. (Side note: This is true of X/Y as well, which uses two cardioids pointing 90 degrees to each other, and of the Blumlein arrangement, which replaces the cardioids with figure-eights.)

Which leads us back to Jules’s M/S microphone, which takes “compact” to a new level by cramming multiple microphones into just one mic body. That makes for a light, portable recording kit that’s quick to set up and tear down; perfect for traveling, or for recording subjects that require substantial hiking to reach.

So why three capsules instead of two? Jules realized that if he took two of the TSB-165 cardioid capsules, faced them in opposite directions, and wired them 180 degrees out of phase with each other in series, they act like a single microphone with a figure-eight pickup pattern. Add a third TSB-165 capsule in the center and you have all the makings of a well matched mid-side microphone.

Where Things Stand Now

My parabolic reflector arrived last week. The mic for the parabolic project is already in-hand, though I may have to (yet again) cut it out of its housing and install it in a new one. I’m in the process of designing the mechanical bits, and should be able to start making them in the next couple of weeks.

I ordered the BM-800 donor mic for my mid-side mic just this morning. Jules posted a link to download the Pimped Alice PCB files that Homero Leal designed based off of Scott Helmke’s original Alice design. Once I have the board mounting hole pattern off of the BM-800 microphone, I’ll add those to Homero’s PCB layout and send the files off to OSH Park for fab.

Work on both of these is contingent on my getting a number of other gotta-do’s off my plate, but I hope to make some progress on both in the next couple of weeks.

Tom

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