The View Up Here

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Posts Tagged ‘Modification’

Alice and Behringer Sitting In A Tree – Part 1

Posted by Tom Benedict on 03/11/2016

The field tests on my BM-800 Alice conversion will have to wait. Late last week I handed it over to a friend for tests I’m not equipped to make, including several mic comparisons. I’m eager to see (and hear!) his results.

Meanwhile my Behringer C-2 mics showed up. These are the ones I placed a bid on over at Ebay before I realized they were coming from Haifa, Israel. Despite the distance the shipping was actually less than FedEx charges to ship a letter-shaped package from the mainland US to Hawaii. (Go figure.) It still ramped the price of the mics up almost to market value, which on Amazon with its super saver free shipping basically means I could’ve ordered them new and had them weeks ago.

But they’re here. And they’re mine. And… to be honest they’re in pretty ratty shape. One of them had something loose in the capsule. If you pointed the mic up and shook it, it made a hellish noise and clipped constantly. Turn it upside down and shake, and you hear something rattling around. The other mic has something massively wrong with its circuit board. It sounds for all the world like a Huey is hovering overhead. Bup bup bup bup bup bup bup… It never ends.

So long story short, I don’t mind gutting these things and building something new. In the short term I put the good capsule on the good mic body so I have one working mic to play with. The other one I started taking apart.

Behringer C-2 Capsule Removed

These have interchangeable capsules, though I don’t know if Behringer (or anyone else) makes any other capsules for it. The one that came with my mics is a hypercardioid. (At least that’s what the icon on the side of the capsule looks like.) Given the size of the vents at the back, I can believe it.

Underneath the capsule is a white plastic plug with a pogo pin centered in it. Not much to look at. And no real clue how to open things up past there.

To gain access to the innards of the mic, peel back the the “Behringer Condenser Microphone” name tape at the base. This reveals a small set screw that should be familiar to anyone with Switchcraft XLR connectors. Screw the set screw all the way in. This releases the XLR connector from the body. Next, center the pad/high-pass filter switch and pull the switch button out with needle nose pliers. Finally, push on the white plastic plug to expose the circuit board.

Behringer C-2 Stereo Pair - Partially Disassembled

Here’s what’s inside:

Behringer C-2 PCB Top

Since one of my mics has a damaged board, rather than figure out how to tweak what’s already here, I went ahead and tried to figure out how to pack a Pimped Alice into the same board space. I started by taking measurements.

The board is 15.5mm wide x 52.35 mm long, and is 1mm thick. The thickness is important because the board slots into the white plastic insert. One nice thing about this method of mounting the board is that there are no screw holes, and except for the humongous XLR pins and the 2mm area that slots into the plastic insert the rest of the real estate on the board is free. The board is mounted just below the centerline of the mic, so there’s vertical room as well. Up to a point, anyway. Those capacitors are 6.5mm diameter x 8mm tall. Nothing bigger than that will fit, even centered on the board.

There’s really not enough room to use through-hole components everywhere, so I converted most of the Pimped Alice circuit to 0805 SMT components. The exceptions are the filter capacitors, the 1Gohm resistor, and the FET.

There seems to be some resistance to using surface mount technology for DIY mics, but SMT has been used for over a decade for DIY robotics and electronics. I’ve built AVR processor boards using SMT components, and figured this wouldn’t be much different. With the exception of the big filter caps and the FET, that’s how Behringer built the original board for the C-2, so I figured it was a safe way to go. As soon as I have a new PCB layout, I’ll send it out for fab.

Meanwhile I started taking apart the capsule. Just looking through the grille, it seems like the C-2 uses a Transsound capsule similar to the TSB-165A Scott Helmke used in the original Alice.

Behringer C-2 Capsule Front

I started by removing the back plate. This is just pressed into place, but it’s a bear to get out. I eventually removed it by gripping it by an inside edge with needle nose pliers (pushing outward), and spinning it out. It took a couple of attempts, but it came apart.

The rear side of the capsule has an open cell foam washer in it, presumably to provide wind protection and to act as a delay plate to shape the hypercardioid pickup pattern. With the washer removed, the back side of the capsule is visible, held in place by a brass retaining ring

Behringer C-2 Capsule Back - Baffle Removed

The holes in the ring are really tiny. My existing pin wrench didn’t work, so I used an old divider with dull points as a pin wrench. There’s a bit of red enamel to prevent the ring from backing out, which took a little force to crack. Once that was done, though, the ring backed out easily. (I’ll need to be sure to apply a fresh bit of enamel when I get the new capsule installed.)

Behringer C-2 Capsule Disassembled Back

Behringer C-2 Capsule Disassembled Front

I was hoping the capsule was a Transsound TSB-165A, the same one Scott Helmke used in his original Alice microphone. Unfortunately it’s not. The capsule in the C-2 is 16mm in diameter x 6mm thick. The TSB-165A is 16.5mm x 8mm. But after some poking around on the JLI Electronics web site I think I found a match: the TSB-160A. The specs are almost identical to the TSB-165A, so it should play nicely with the Alice circuit (yay!), but the form factor matches what’s in the C-2. I’ll order a pair of these when I place the order for the 165A capsules for my MS Alice.

Behringer C-2 Capsule Mesh Outside

Another concern with the C-2 capsule holder is how the capsule is recessed, and how close the edges of the holder come to the input ports on the capsule. From my experiences with my first rev of mic bodies, I know that can color the sound enough to hear it. I’d like to open this up, if possible. It’s a simple enough job on a lathe as long as I can get the grill out.

Behringer C-2 Capsule Mesh Inside

The grill looks like it’s a two-layer mesh that’s either glued or soldered into the capsule holder. That should be easy enough to remove with heat, one way or the other. I might even be able to re-use it if I’m not too rough getting it out.

The grill serves two purposes. First and foremost, it’s an RF shield to keep stray electromagnetic radiation from getting into the signal path. Second, it helps to keep the capsule free of debris. Third, some manufacturers will stick enough mesh in front of the capsule to act as a rudimentary pop filter, and at least reduce the effect of wind. The problem with that third purpose is that you need a lot of tight mesh to pull that off. Enough so that it colors the sound of the mic. Not surprisingly, one of the more obvious mic mods is to remove a layer of mesh from the capsule housing.

But given how open the outer mesh is, I’m afraid it will make the mic prone to RF interference. For now I’ll leave it alone.

The next steps are to finalize the design of the new board, send it out for fab, and source all the components and capsules. But before I can finalize the board design I want to see if I can add in one of the features of the C-2: The switch on the side of the mic lets you select a high pass filter or a -10dB pad. If I can find the real estate on the board to accommodate the switch and the components necessary to add these into the Alice circuit, I will.

Tom

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