The View Up Here

Random scribblings about kites, photography, machining, and anything else

Building the MS Alice Microphone – Part 1

Posted by Tom Benedict on 11/11/2016

This is a short pair of articles that glosses over most of the details of how I’m building a self-contained mid-side (MS) Alice microphone into a Neewer NW-800 microphone body. Part 1 covers most of the design and preparation, and Part 2 will cover the build.

The reason why this pair of articles is so brief is that most of the nitty-gritty was already covered in another pair of articles: BM-800 Microphone Conversion Part 1 and Part 2. The major differences between that microphone and this one are a change in capsules (Transsound TSB-165A instead of a Transsound TSB-2555B), the number of capsules (three instead of one), the number of Pimped Alice boards (two instead of one), and a change tof XLR connector (5-pin rather than 3-pin).

With the exception of how I’m planning to mount the capsules, all of this follows the Instructable written by Jules Ryckenbusch: Build the MS Alice Stereo Microphone. That’s the real reference for this build, so if you decide to build one of these yourself be sure to follow Jules’s notes.

The easy stuff first:

When I built my first Alice microphone I built three PCBs rather than just the one I needed, so I already have two Pimped Alice boards ready and waiting in the wings. I was on the fence whether to build a second mic around a TSB-2555B capsule or go straight to the MS Alice. After some recent field tests, I decided to commit the two boards to an MS Alice.

Jules pulled a neat trick for getting two signals out of a single XLR connector: use a different XLR connector! In his build he replaced the 3-pin XLR that came with his BM-800 microphone with a 5-pin. The two outputs share a common ground, but have independent signal pins. I’m following this part of his plan to the letter. (As a side note, this also gives me a spare 3-pin XLR connector to use when I finally build out my parabolic mic. New project in the works!)

The only things left to do were to order three TSB-165A capsules (done) and to figure out how to mount them.

Jules has a nice tutorial on how to build a 3-capsule saddle out of PVC pipe, but I had so much fun machining a custom saddle for my TSB-2555B capsule, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to massively over-complicate life by designing a custom saddle for the MS Alice as well. Here’s what I came up with:

MS Alice TSB-165A Capsule Saddle

Which looks neat and all, but would be stupidly difficult to machine. It’s possible, provided you got rid of, or at least filleted the inside corner between the two side capsules, but it wouldn’t be fun. And since this is all about fun, I cheated. I sent it off to be 3D printed out of nylon. (If this pans out and there’s any interest, I’m happy to make the 3D model available for other people to print.)

So now I’m back to playing the waiting game. I’ve got parts coming in from Redco Audio (5-pin XLR to dual 3-pin XLR splitter cable), Mouser (smaller capacitors for the Alice boards to address the space constraint issue I ran into), Amazon (Switchcraft 5-pin XLR connector, NW-800 body, and associated doodads), JLI Electronics (three TSB-165A capsules), and finally Shapeways (the 3D printed mic saddle).

I’ll write the second half of this series once all the goodies show up.

Tom

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One Response to “Building the MS Alice Microphone – Part 1”

  1. […] « Building the MS Alice Microphone – Part 1 […]

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