The View Up Here

Random scribblings about kites, photography, machining, and anything else

Archive for March, 2016

Life, Or The Effects Thereof

Posted by Tom Benedict on 23/03/2016

Despite the progress I’ve made on my sound gear I haven’t had much of a chance to get out with it. Life, or the effects thereof, got in the way.

A little over a month ago I wound up with severe neck and shoulder pain. It took about three weeks to get a slot with a physical therapist, but that meant I had time to get my x-rays done in advance. The results weren’t great. Years of kite flying combined with overall bad posture means I’ve partially compressed one of the discs in my neck, and decades of neck jerking tics because of my Tourette’s means I’ve given myself repeated whiplash injuries in the same general area, and the beginnings of arthritis in my spine. PT is going well, but I’m not in a position to carry gear, fly a kite, hike, etc. So I’m out of commission when it comes to sound recording, kite aerial photography, photography in general, RC airplane flying, or pretty much everything else I do for a hobby. For the record, I’m officially broken.

Another two to three weeks should see me past the worst of the pain, but I can’t keep doing things the way I have been. Part of the physical therapy is re-learning how to look up. Despite how simple this sounds I’m trying to un-do forty seven years of bad posture. Even if I pull it off (and I’m bound and determined to pull it off!) when I do get back into KAP in a serious way I’ll need to use belay glasses or something similar in order to avoid further injury to my spine. Likewise if I stick with the PT regimen I should be able to wear a backpack again some time in the near future. But walking for hours carrying twenty pounds of KAP gear is off the list permanently.

I don’t necessarily have to give up any of my hobbies, but I do need to re-think how I do them. I’m trying to re-think how I carry sound gear so most of the weight is contained in a waist pack. There’s a fantastic thread on the KAP Forum about repackaging RC transmitters into more compact and much more functional units. Meanwhile lighter, more capable cameras have come on the market that mean there’s no real point in flying a DSLR from a kite any more. If I can shave the weight I’m carrying and figure out better ways to carry it, I should be able to keep on playing for many many decades to come. But if I don’t make the effort the outcome is certain.

Take care of yourself. There’s only one you in all the universe.

Tom

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DIY Microphone: EM172 Capsule and XLR Plug

Posted by Tom Benedict on 05/03/2016

This is the last in a four part series about powering the Primo EM172 microphone capsule. Part 1 outlined the problem of how to provide 5-10v to the capsule and predicted some results. Part 2 shared some results and pointed out that the gain differences between inputs on my recorder invalidated my predictions. Part 3 discussed my reasons for going with XLR connectors on all my microphones, and some of the details of that. This last part puts it all together into a step-by-step DIY for building microphones with Primo EM172 capsules, powered by 48v phantom power on an XLR plug.

If you need to build a microphone based around the EM172 capsule that plugs into the 1/8″ mic jack on your recorder, or a laptop, tablet, whatever, there are already several excellent tutorials out there. Rather than adapt this one to your needs, refer to one of the existing tutorials. The two I used when I first started building EM172 microphones were the ones on Zach Poff’s page and the one on Wild Mountain Echoes.

In this DIY I’m going to assume you already have a plan for making a mic body. I made mine out of Delrin bar stock on a lathe. Others have used Sharpie pen caps, which also provide a nice clip for clipping the mic to things (see the tutorial on Wild Mountain Echoes), PVC pipe, brass tubing, etc. When mounting the mic in the mic body, make sure the front of the capsule is flush with or slightly proud of the mic body. Don’t recess it. I made that mistake with my first set of mics and wound up with mics that sounded like they were inside a sewer pipe. If in doubt experiment by wiring up the mic completely, plugging it in, and listening to it as you slide it in and out of the mic body you plan to use. After all, this is DIY. Experimentation is part of the deal.

Primo BT-EM172 to P48 XLR Wiring

Credit for the circuit goes entirely to David McGriffy, and credit for the component choice goes entirely to David McGriffy and Ricardo Lee. Ricardo Lee’s writeup, SimpleP48wm61, goes into the theory of the circuit and the reasons for the component choices in depth. It’s the real reference for this. (In order to use that link to download Ricardo’s file, you may need to be a member of the micbuilders group on Yahoo!. If you’re doing this DIY you’re a mic builder, so it’s not a stretch.)

EDIT: A couple of weeks ago Akira So brought to my attention that I had the capacitor poloarity reversed from how David McGriffy and Ricardo Lee have it in SimpleP48. I’ve since corrected the schematic here. Credit where credit’s due.

EDIT: Akira also pointed out that my value for R (120k) resulted in something like 1.3-1.5V at the capsule. I experimented with a number of resistors to see what value of R would produce 7.5V at the capsule on my recorder, and for a Tascam DR-70D, R=40k produces just over 7.5V. When you do this build, you will have to find what works best for your equipment.

EDIT: I also swapped the supplier for the EM172 from Frogloggers to Micbooster (FEL Communications). I haven’t heard from Gene at Frogloggers in a while. Hoping he’s doing ok.

For my build I used the following:

I also used some metal tape (copper in my case, from the local gardening center), heat shrink of various sizes, and the solder I found on the bench in the lab. (My Alphametals solder I’ve been using for the past 20 years isn’t ROHS certified, so I can’t say “use this stuff, it’s great!”)

Not including the tools necessary to fabricate the mic bodies, you’ll also need:

  • Soldering iron (temperature regulated if possible)
  • Source of heat for heat shrink (heat gun, lighter, etc.)
  • Assortment of wire cutters, strippers, fine tip pliers, etc.

Since most of the bodies people use for these require the mic to slide in  from the front end of the housing, we’ll start with the mic capsule.

EM172 Back End

The first step is to strip one end of the cable, trim back the red and white wires to a workable length, and still leave plenty of shield exposed. The red and white wires are then soldered onto the appropriate pads on the capsule.

Warning: The EM172 capsule is sensitive to heat. These two photos were made with a capsule I’d killed using an unregulated soldering iron, which is why the capsule looks a little ugly. If you have access to a regulated iron set your iron no higher than 735C and don’t hold the iron on a pad for more than a few seconds. If you don’t have access to a regulated soldering iron, be sure to get EM172 capsules with stub leads already soldered in place. The tutorial on Wild Mountain Echoes uses capsules with stub leads, so you can see how she did it. Do all your work on the stub leads. Don’t fry your microphones!

EM172 With Wires

Now we build the shielding around the capsule itself. Insulate the sides and back of the capsule with some heat shrink.

Capsule Isolated

Be sure to account for every strand in the shield as you bring it up and over the heat shrink. Wrap with foil tape and trim back the shield so no wires protrude. Be sure no wires cross over the heat shrink and touch the front of the capsule.

Making a Shield

Apply a second layer of heat shrink over the foil tape. I like to apply a short length of colored heat shrink to help me identify which mic is which when I’m running wires and plugging things in out in the field.

Heat Shrunk Ready To Go

At this point go ahead and run the mic cable through your mic body, but don’t mount the capsule just yet. Once you’ve soldered the connector end of the cable, it’s a good idea to test everything to make sure you didn’t make any soldering mistakes, and to make sure the capsule didn’t get damaged during soldering. Strip the other end of the cable, leaving a little more wire to work with than on the capsule end. Thread the wire through the end cap for the XLR connector and set it aside. Since the XLR connector provides its own shield you don’t have to do any metal tape trickery on this end. Gather the wires from the cable’s shield, twist into a bundle, and cover with heat shrink tubing. This is also a good time to apply a length of colored heat shrink to match the capsule end of the cable.

Cable Prepped With Shell

Grab the XLR connector body in a vise or some other holding fixture. If you don’t have a vise, a set of vise-grip pliers with tape over the serrated part of the jaw works well. Just don’t grab it so hard that the connector body is damaged or distorted. Another way to hold these connectors that works great is to have the mating connector screwed into a board. Plug the connector you’re working on into its counterpart and solder to your heart’s content. (I used a vise.)

Trim back the leads on the capacitor and resistor to something reasonable that’ll fit inside the XLR connector. Save the snipped off bits of the leads. One of these works well to bridge from pin 1 to the ground tab.

Resistor and Capacitor

Solder a leftover component lead from pin 1 to the ground tab. Next, solder one end of the resistor to the ground tab as well. Next, solder the (-) end of the capacitor to pin 2. Finally, tie the two free ends of the capacitor and resistor together.

XLR Plug with McGriffy Components

All that’s left is to solder the cable onto the plug. Red goes to pin 3, white goes to the (+) lead of the capacitor as well as the free end of the resistor, and the cable’s shield is soldered to the ground tab. (In this photo the connector is rotated 180 degrees from how it’s drawn in the schematic, but that’s how the solder cups are oriented. Flip it around in your mind and it’ll make sense.)

XLR Plug with Cable

At this point your microphone’s electronics are finished. Put the connector together and screw things tight.

This is a good time to test the mic to make sure nothing went wrong. Plug it into your recorder, turn on phantom 48v power, and dial up the gain. If all went well you should have a low noise microphone ready to be installed in its mic body. If not, go back and check each step to find out what went wrong.

Finished Mic

Have fun recording!

Tom

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