The View Up Here

Random scribblings about kites, photography, machining, and anything else

Powering the EM172 Capsule – Part 3: Capitulation

Posted by Tom Benedict on 23/02/2016

I made up my mind about powering my EM172 microphones. Ultimately this decision had less to do with how I was powering the microphones than how I was plugging the mics into the recorder. One of the things I discovered when I wrote my last post was that the Tascam DR-70D uses completely different amplifiers for the XLR inputs and the 1/8″ inputs. Different form factor, obviously; different impedance; different gain. It’s that last part that really drove this decision.

The gain ranges on the 1/8″ plug are +3dB, +11dB, +26dB, and +38dB. The XLR gain ranges are +21dB, +36dB, +51dB, and +63dB. While I was performing side-by-side tests I kept having to crank back the gain on the XLR input to match the levels on the 1/8″ input. As I tested with quieter and quieter subjects it finally hit me: +38dB of gain just wasn’t enough to bring up the levels of some of the subjects I want to record. The XLR input gave me more gain to play with. The last test I ran was what finally convinced me. Even with the gain cranked all the way up on the 1/8″ input mics, I couldn’t get the sound levels over -25dBFS. The recording was just too quiet to use. I cranked up the gain on the XLR input, and was able to get -12dBFS with the same subject.

Good news is the mics really do perform better with the 9.6v bias voltage David McGriffy’s circuit provides. So this is a win-win.

The lavalier mics were no problem to convert. I bought a stash of Neutrik XLR connectors when I started this whole investigation, so it was just a matter of lopping off the 1/8″ connectors and soldering up the XLRs with the resistor and capacitor from McGriffy’s circuit.

XLR-Converted Lavalier

My SASS was another story. I really hate having things with cords that can’t be unplugged, so I wanted to connectorize everything and use extension cables. Only problem: I’m a beginner! So I had no idea how all the connectors worked.

After some Googling and image searching I learned that:

  • XLR extension cables are gender-inspecific. One end is male, the other is female.
  • Female XLR connectors are the ones with the latch. This is true of both panel and cable connectors. So female panel connectors have a latch, but male panel connectors don’t. (This confused me.)
  • Neutrik makes a crapload of XLR connectors you can choose from. It’s worth looking them up in multiple catalogs to find out which series were developed to fix the bugs in previous series. Though it’s really hard to go wrong, so long as you get all the genders right. These things are built like tanks.

I picked up a pair of pre-built 10′ extension cables for a little over the price of the connectors themselves along with some male panel jacks to install in the SASS. Installation meant cutting into the back of my SASS, but it went quite smoothly and the results look (and sound!) nice. (Yeah, this is an infrared photo. Ironwood trees look like Dr. Seuss trees in the IR, so I just had to play.)

SASS Back in the Field

Meanwhile I figured it was finally time to solve the issue of wind protection. A few months back I learned I’m really REALLY bad at sewing fake fur. I did some reading since then, so I think I know what I did wrong. But rather than getting stalled on my own lack of sewing skill I ordered a pair of lavalier windscreens from Cat Ears. They fit over my oversized mic bodies, but they’re too small to go over a foam windscreen. I probably needed the larger ones. They do a decent job by themselves, but in wind over 15-20kts the mics still suffer from wind noise. Good enough to use the lavs as tree ears, but not enough to use them at the beach in solid wind.

Cat Ears Windscreens

Now I just need to solve the issue of wind protection for my SASS. Back to learning to sew fur…

In any case my gear and I are off the soldering bench and back out in the field. Finally. YAAAAAAAY!

Tom

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One Response to “Powering the EM172 Capsule – Part 3: Capitulation”

  1. […] and pointed out that the gain differences between inputs on my recorder invalidated my predictions. Part 3 discussed my reasons for going with XLR connectors on all my microphones, and some of the details […]

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