The View Up Here

Random scribblings about kites, photography, machining, and anything else

SPIE Poster

Posted by Tom Benedict on 08/06/2010

As with most of the projects I do for work, the SPIE poster didn’t work out 100% as expected.  Once I started going through the photographs and diagrams I wanted to stick on the poster, and figured in the size everything had to be in order to be readable at a distance, that 36″x45″ started to look awfully small.  And no matter how neat I tried to make it, that background texture of snow was just distracting.  So out went the theme of “cold” and in came the theme of “I have no clue what I’m doing.”

So I ran with it.

SPIE 2010 - Espadons PCC Poster

I really didn’t know how I wanted to lay the poster out, so I gave up and didn’t.  The text blocks were set on a page I tore out of a notebook and scanned on our Xerox Workcentre printer.  The photos were set in Polaroid-like frames I’d used for the KAP talk I gave a couple of weeks ago.  (True Polaroid frames are taller than they are wide.  These were tweaked to fit the aspect ratio of the photos.)  The graph and diagram were superimposed over the graph paper letterhead we use at work, likewise scanned on the Xerox.  The only traditional object on the poster is a JPG reconstruction of our monitoring web site for this cryosystem.  If the poster looks scattered, it’s because I was, too.

But in talking to people around the company, the feedback I got was that the approach actually worked.  The whole job of the poster at a poster session is to draw someone’s interest long enough for them to come over and talk.  Even if they come over to ask what the @#$^ I was drinking when I made the poster, that’s good enough for me.  If they want to talk cryocoolers, that’s fine.  If they want to talk poster layout, that’s ok, too.

The best part was when I brought my 11″x17″ test print of the poster home last night.  One of my kids asked what it was.  “It’s…  It’s my science fair poster!”  And know what?  It’s true.

– Tom

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